Sunday, November 18, 2007

Seets i' Blackpool

Ne'then, 'ere's sommet f't conny-sewers o' Lanky Twang an' Yarkshire Di-leck (wot clearly arm not). 'Tis a reet gradely docomunt on lorn from't kindly gentleman Mister Barker o'er at Rossul Beach. Tha's gonna lak this, 'cos us is seery-lizin' eet as mid-wickly pastin's from now 'til eet's dun.
Any'ow, 'ere's first installmunt, as eet wur, compleet wi' cover an' introduckshun an' awl. As alus, jus' click on't thum-neel so's thee cun read it proper:


An' 'ere's tha fronty pieces as promist:

An' also as promist 'ere's than introduckshun:

Wull geddont' boo-uk proper next week. It's reet grand. 'Onist!

12 comments:

John said...

An interesting little book, it seems; quite humorous. I'm guessing this is from the teens or 20's, but a right date would be nice, as well as more of the book.

And the word Patternoster... where have I heard that word afore?

Cheers, JOHN :0)

Brian Hughes said...

John,

Not sure when it's from. Judging by the price and the cover illustration I'd guess at either Victorian or Edwardian. There's more to come anyway, so perhaps we'll find out as the story unfolds.

As for Paternoster Row...purely coincidence, I assure you...and spelt differently too I might add.

Ann O'Dyne said...

Chief Detective Superintendant Dalziel will be over to nick you for that.

Brian Hughes said...

Ann,

That's fine by me...just so long as he leaves that dilbert Pascoe behind in Yorkshire.

Ann O'Dyne said...

I love Reginald Hill's style and was sad that the feisty (OK, crass and obscene) dialogue diluted as the TV series developed.
I love blogreading too, and learn something everyday; today it was that one may look intently at an existing link URL without seeing there is a letter in it that one has omitted from a post link to same.
Conclusion drawn: never cause oneself to be at the mercy of a witness in a court of law.
'Patternoster", paternoster, off to Guugle I'm gone.

Brian Hughes said...

Anne...

Thee odd addittional lettter when you're half assleep tends to creep in without warnning, and the ocasional omited leter does the same. I have ben knowen to comit certain literrary atrocitiees myself...including, it seeems, thee extranaeous 'e' on the end of your nam.

Ann O'Dyne said...

No sweat mate.
With Melvyn Bragg's help, I'll get by - down here we currently have his TV series explaining language to us.
There is a blog written by a guy channelling Chaucer (I think he is a Yank), and a blog where only the first and last letters of each word are in the correct sequence which still remains comprehensible; so when i want real confusion I'll just run over to them.

peas and love.

Brian Hughes said...

Ann,

In order to speak Melvyn you first have to stick a plum in your mouth and a pea up each nostril.

As for the bloke channelling Chaucer, I hope he's writing everything in Olde English (otherwise known as Anglo-Saxon), the language in which the Cantebury Tales were originally written, otherwise he might just be a fraud. Personally I doubt that he's a fraud, of course. I mean, I'm sure Chaucer would choose an American to speak through because he couldn't make his voice heard via Melvyn's nasal passages.

Ann O'Dyne said...

of course I was incorrect - he's in Kent.
"lundi, novembre 12, 2007
Chaucer the Holy-Wood Scabbe

Yf ye wonder, lordinges and ladyes, wher Galfridus Chaucer hath been synce September, the answer is: in a verray purgatorie of busynesse. It pleseth me litel to labour as clerk of the kinges werkes, and yet labor ich muste, for Philippa forever addeth to our hous yn Kent and litel Lowys is beginning to speke of applyinge to Universitee next yeere (the whiche surpriseth me gretely – paraventure it is the ale of Oxford that lureth hym, not the bookes)".

and he mentions ale and the only thing I know about Kent is the hops and that my ancestor William Brown left Deal, Kent for Australia in 1853.

Brian Hughes said...

Ann,

That's not Saxon...that's just modern english spelt badly. Presumably Chaucer must have updated the verbal aspects of his language skills in heaven, but not run across Samuel Johnson yet.

By the way...don't forget to sign the Fylde and Wyre Antiquarian Guest Book will you? The link's at the top of the page in the right hand column. You could even sign it in 'pfuedo-Chausoir' if you like.

Ann O'Dyne said...

fuestbook fchmeftbook .. down here in the antipodean colonief, we are barely literate.

Many of us are thrilled that the conservative government was defeated at election yefterday.

I am, however, too fceptical to join the celebration.

Do you think those Shackleton's Journey survivors should now have to pay a premium for getting a more authentic voyage than they expected when they boarded a vessel registered in Liberia?
hahaHaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

Brian Hughes said...

Ann,

I don't blame you for not celebrating. I too remember when the conservatives were ousted from power many years ago. As an old socialist myself it was a great sensation to see the mighty right wing fall...but all was not as it seemed. Once bitten, as they say, twice shy...or in the case of New Labour, twice bitten and then gnawed on constantly until the present day.